Call Us: +44 (0) 1628 947740
My Cart£0.00

Specialist Naval Publishers & Booksellers | Free UK Mainland Delivery on orders of more than £100.00

Product was successfully added to your shopping cart.

Battle of Midway (Images of War)

John Grehan

America's Decisive Strike in the Pacific in WWII
Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in the Hawaiian Islands on 7 December 1941, had severely damaged the United States Pacific Fleet but had not destroyed it, for the fleet's aircraft carrier force had been at sea when the Japanese struck. After the Battle of the Coral Sea in early May 1942, in which both sides had lost one carrier, the commander of the Japanese Combined Fleet, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, calculated that the US had only two serviceable carriers left.
Yamamoto had hoped to draw the US carriers into his trap but instead he sailed into an ambush. The four-day battle resulted in the loss of all four Japanese aircraft carriers, the US losing only one. The Japanese were never able to recover from these losses, and it was the Americans who were able to take control of the Pacific.

The Battle of Midway, unquestionably, marked the turning point in the war against Japan.

Availability: In stock

£14.99
 
-+

Details

Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in the Hawaiian Islands on 7 December 1941, had severely damaged the United States Pacific Fleet but had not destroyed it, for the fleet's aircraft carrier force had been at sea when the Japanese struck. This meant that, despite the overwhelming success of Japanese military forces across the Pacific, US carrier-based aircraft could still attack Japanese targets. After the Battle of the Coral Sea in early May 1942, in which both sides had lost one carrier, the commander of the Japanese Combined Fleet, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, calculated that the US had only two serviceable carriers left. If those remaining carriers could be lured into a battle with the Combined Fleet and destroyed, nothing could stop the Japanese achieving complete control of the South Pacific. It would take the United States many months, even with its massive industrial muscle, to rebuild its carried fleet if it was destroyed, by which time Japan would be able to secure the raw materials needed to keep its war machine functioning and to build all the bases it required across the Pacific, which would enable its aircraft to dominate the entire region. Aware of the sensitivity of the Americans towards Hawaii after the Battle of Pearl Harbor, Yamamoto believed that if he attacked there again, the US commander, Admiral Nimitz would be certain to commit all his strength to its defence. Yamamoto selected the furthest point of the Hawaiian Islands, the Naval Air Station on the Midway Atoll, for his attack, which was beyond the range of most US land-based aircraft. Yamamoto launched his attack on 4 June 1942\. But the US had intercepted and deciphered Japanese signals and Nimitz, with three not two aircraft carriers, knew exactly Yamamoto's plans. Yamamoto had hoped to draw the US carriers into his trap but instead he sailed into an ambush. The four-day battle resulted in the loss of all four Japanese aircraft carriers, the US losing only one. The Japanese were never able to recover from these losses, and it was the Americans who were able to take control of the Pacific. The Battle of Midway, unquestionably, marked the turning point in the war against Japan.

ISBN: 9781526758347
Format: Paperback
Author(s): John Grehan
First Publishment Date: 24 September 2019

Additional Information

Coming Soon No
  1. Highly Recommended review by Alex Manning on 30/06/2020

    The front cover of this book tells us that it’s one of the ‘Images of War’ series, providing an immediate clue as to its format and contents - lots (and I do mean lots) of images and maps complementing a well-structured and wholly readable text that, together, take the reader hour by hour and day by day through each phase of the battle that became the early turning point of the Pacific naval war. While many may already be aware of the dramatic events of 4 June 1942 that saw the four fleet carriers of the Japanese Kido Butai (‘Mobile Force’) destroyed, the book casts its net wider, covering the whole period 3-7 June to present the battle in its full context - the first long-range contacts on 3 June, the attack on Midway Atoll itself on 4 June and the destruction of the Japanese carriers for the loss of just one American that same day and subsequent actions that included the sinking of the heavy cruisers Mogami and Mikuma. Its introductory chapter, “The Build-Up to Battle”, sets the scene very well, explaining the key events preceding it and the strategic thinking governing both sides’ approach. For the Japanese it involved a switch from the stunningly successful offensive campaign that had secured her all of South-East Asia and most of the Pacific from the Philippines to just a few hundred miles west of the Hawaiian Islands, of which Midway itself was the most north-westerly, to one of consolidation. This involved the creation of an impregnable defensive ring around her acquisitions that would force the United States and her European allies to the negotiating table on Japanese terms. This, however, implicitly required the destruction of the US Pacific Fleet’s aircraft carriers, these having been at sea when Pearl Harbor was attacked and their continued existence now preventing completion of that grand strategic plan. This, the author explains, is what ultimately led to the Battle of Midway. The Japanese C-in-C Admiral Yamamoto had devised a plan centred on an invasion of Midway itself to draw the Americans and their carriers into a decisive battle that would see them destroyed. His complex plan, however, was predicated on two key beliefs, firstly that the Americans would conform to his plan and, secondly, that they had only two carriers to his four, when in fact they had three, the Yorktown having been repaired in record time after the earlier Battle of the Coral Sea. One of his own carriers, the Shokaku, had also been severely damaged in that same battle and was unavailable for the Midway operation. Grehan surmises that, had she been there as well, the outcome might well have been very different, an interesting point. The other crucial advantage the Americans had was that they had broken the Japanese naval code so knew virtually from the outset what they were up to, while Admiral Nagumo of the Kido Butai in particular, as the man on the spot, could only hope the Americans’ own moves would conform to requirement, which of course they didn’t. This is a very well-researched, well-presented and extensively illustrated book that succeeds in actually taking you to the battle, not least through the many personal stories it contains. Highly recommended.

Write Your Own Review

UK Only

Order ValueDelivery Fee
Less than £10.00 £1.80
Between £10.00 & £100.00 £3.25
Over £100.00 FREE

EU

Order ValueDelivery Fee
Less than £10.00 £4.25
Between £10.00 & £125.00 £8.20
Over £125.00 FREE

Australia & New Zealand

Order ValueDelivery Fee
Less than £10.00 £5.00
Between £10.00 & £125.00 £14.50
Over £125.00 FREE

USA & Rest of the World

Order ValueDelivery Fee
Less than £10.00 £4.50
Between £10.00 & £125.00 £12.90
Over £125.00 FREE