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Seaforth World Naval Review 2019

Conrad Waters

Now celebrating its tenth edition, World Naval Review provides an affordable but yet authoritative summary of global naval developments over the past 12 months. Regional surveys of fleet evolution and procurement by editor Conrad Waters are supplemented by in-depth articles from a range of subject experts focusing on significant new warships, technological advances and specific navies.

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Now celebrating its tenth edition, World Naval Review provides an affordable but yet authoritative summary of global naval developments over the past 12 months. Regional surveys of fleet evolution and procurement by editor Conrad Waters are supplemented by in-depth articles from a range of subject experts focusing on significant new warships, technological advances and specific navies. Features in this edition include extended reviews of the new aircraft carriers USS Gerald R. Ford and HMS Queen Elizabeth, the largest ships ever to serve in their respective fleets. Technological subjects include assessments of naval communications by Norman Friedman and autonomous systems by Richard Scott, whilst David Hobbs’ usual review of naval aviation is expanded to include a broader analysis of key trends over the last decade. Meanwhile, reviews of specific fleets focus on the navies of Canada, Peru and Singapore, all medium-sized naval powers at critical – if very different – phases of their development. Firmly established as providing the only annual naval overview of its type, World Naval Review is essential reading for anyone – whether enthusiast or professional – interested in contemporary maritime affairs.

ISBN: 9781526745859
Format: Hardback
Author(s): Conrad Waters
First Publishment Date: 14 November 2018

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  1. This book really is a “must” for anyone wishing to stay abreast of naval developments. Informative and well presented – very highly recommended. review by PCW-M on 07/03/2019

    I have regularly reviewed this annual publication now in its 10th year, and like good wine, its gets better every year.

    The introduction addresses the ramp up of global tensions, with increased emphasis on naval forces albeit in many cases replacement as opposed to new capabilities. There has been a particular increase in Asian countries’ defence spending, well illustrated by a section on Singapore which has built “one of the most sophisticated and efficient navies anywhere”. Singapore acknowledges her dependence upon maritime trade and with the benefit of a strong economy has built a fleet of modern and well equipped frigates, corvettes and submarines, although manning the fleet is a challenge. Another navy covered in detail is the Royal Canadian Navy with a key role in defending Canada’s EEZ including Arctic waters. Canada has pledged to rebuild its blue water fleet which has been reduced by loss of older ships without replacement. The 12 Halifax-class frigates will now be replaced by “up to 15” Type 26s in the 2020s, although this announcement has been challenged by the consortium bidding the Dutch De Zeven Provincien. The RCN T26s, a new class of Arctic capable offshore patrol vessels, and 2 new replenishment ships will restore the RCN if the programme is funded properly.

    2018 has seen the emergence of two new capital ships, the American Gerald Ford and the British HMS Queen Elizabeth and their development are covered in detail. Gerald Ford, with some 23 new systems including the EMALS catapult system and new arrestor gear, is a step change from the Nimitz Class and her introduction has not been without issues. Her flight deck layout and munitions handling arrangements have been modified to allow more flexibility and more sorties. Manpower has also been reduced although there is an interesting comparison with the Queen Elizabeth whose fully automated weapons’ handling system has resulted in significant larger manpower savings. The Queen Elizabeth section covers the design development and construction of the ship. With the ship very successfully completing both phases of the F-35B flight trials this year, the massive achievement of introducing this new ship should not be underestimated. The naval aviation theme is continued in a review of world naval aviation that looks back over the last 10 years as more nations develop aviation capable ships. Looking ahead, the author sees a dramatic increase in the development of unmanned aircraft.

    The regional roundups cover a range of issues. The expansion plans of the 2 largest navies (the USN and PLA(N), the growth in Middle Eastern navies as they move away from purely coastal forces, and the problems faced by India with inadequate funding and industrial problems. European nations are addressing naval shipbuilding and collaborative projects as they seek to reverse the post Cold War decline in navies. Meanwhile the Russian Navy is increasingly reliant on smaller, capable littoral combatants replacing the elderly Soviet era larger ships, but modernisation of her strategic submarine force remains the top priority.

    This book really is a “must” for anyone wishing to stay abreast of naval developments. Informative and well presented – very highly recommended.

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